Transit-Oriented Development (TOD)

When the Philadelphia Zoning Code was amended in August, 2012, a Transit–Oriented Development (“TOD”) Overlay District was included.  Such districts have become increasingly favored by urban planners as a way to encourage development adjacent to transit hubs, with associated increase in the use of public transit and a decrease in reliance upon private transportation.  However, the provision included in the 2012 Zoning Code proved cumbersome, and during the intervening 4+ years, no parcel in Philadelphia has been so designated.  In response, Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown and Councilman Bill Greenlee jointly introduced on February 23, 2017, a new ordinance amending the TOD overlay (ordinance # 170162).

Public transit
Copyright: 06photo / 123RF Stock Photo

The main objective of the proposed new Overlay District is to both simplify the application of the TOD and increase bonuses, which would be available to landowners and developers who utilize it. To achieve the simplification, the Overlay District would apply to any parcel located within 500 feet of a designated transit station.  It is anticipated that stations will be so designated only by action of City Council, and presumably only after approval of the District City Council person in whose district the TOD will be designated.

There will be a development bonus of 30% of the otherwise permitted FAR for parcels located in the TOD.  Furthermore, bonus FAR is available for green buildings, next income housing, provision of public space, provision of underground parking, and certain transit connections.  Where bonuses of 150% are available, generally, in the Philadelphia Zoning Code for provision of such items, in the TOD, bonuses can be accumulated allowing for an increase of FAR of 200%.

One interesting provision of the proposed new ordinance is that for the first time, Philadelphia would impose a maximum amount of parking which can be made available in connection with a project.  This change will be welcome by planning professionals, who hope similar provisions will be applied in Center City.

It is certainly unclear whether or not City Council will pass the ordinance in the form introduced, but if passed, the City’s planning professionals will seek to convince members of City Council to designate a small number of pilot TOD districts, which will be tested to see whether increased development can be triggered by this approach.

As of this blog post, City Council’s Rules Committee has not scheduled the ordinance for a public hearing.  It appears that usual, short-term concern about parking availability may delay the implementation of this forward-looking approach.